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2020 Kawasaki KRX
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Elevation and temperature both affect tire pressure. I live at 5,300'. Where I camp and ride is about 8,500' and only goes up from there. If I set my tires at 10 psi at the house, they will be up to about 12 psi when I get to camp. They gain approximately 1 psi for every 1,000' elevation from there. If I adjust my tires for a ride in the 10,500'/12,000'+ range, they will be looking flat when I get back to the house. It's the actual tire pressure that changes, not the gauge. Pressure also builds with heat. With the temperature swings here from night to day, (upper 30's overnight, 70's/80's daytime highs) my tires can build 2-3 psi easily from morning to afternoon just from the temperature increase. There are a lot of variables in play around here when it comes to tire pressures. I also know guys who set their pressures at the house and never give it another thought. lol
 

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2020 Green KRX
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Elevation and temperature both affect tire pressure. I live at 5,300'. Where I camp and ride is about 8,500' and only goes up from there. If I set my tires at 10 psi at the house, they will be up to about 12 psi when I get to camp. They gain approximately 1 psi for every 1,000' elevation from there. If I adjust my tires for a ride in the 10,500'/12,000'+ range, they will be looking flat when I get back to the house. It's the actual tire pressure that changes, not the gauge. Pressure also builds with heat. With the temperature swings here from night to day, (upper 30's overnight, 70's/80's daytime highs) my tires can build 2-3 psi easily from morning to afternoon just from the temperature increase. There are a lot of variables in play around here when it comes to tire pressures. I also know guys who set their pressures at the house and never give it another thought. lol
I see where you’re coming from. We get cars everyday with TPMS lights on. Difference is a TPMS sensor measures absolute pressure vs a tire gauge (digital) measures atmospheric. TPMS sensors are calibrated to sea level. I took the same theory to my KRX even though it doesn’t have sensors. You are correct though the hire the elevation the pressure rises. I edited my previous post to fix that. My bad. All my vehicles if I pump 35 the tpms sensors show 33. This is at 5300 foot elevation.
 

· Super Moderator
2020 Kawasaki KRX
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I see where you’re coming from. We get cars everyday with TPMS lights on. Difference is a TPMS sensor measures absolute pressure vs a tire gauge (digital) measures atmospheric. TPMS sensors are calibrated to sea level. I took the same theory to my KRX even though it doesn’t have sensors. You are correct though the hire the elevation the pressure rises. I edited my previous post to fix that. My bad. All my vehicles if I pump 35 the tpms sensors show 33. This is at 5300 foot elevation.
Yeah, my TPMS are off as well on my car and my truck. 2 psi is about right when checking them with a tire gauge vs tpms. TPMS is always low.
 

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2020 Green KRX
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okay we are getting way too deep in the weeds here. My head will hurt trying to figure out the TPMS. however, if you are at sea level or 10,000 ft and you have a normal tire pressure gauge, whatever the pressure in the tire is, that's what will read on the gauge
 

· Super Moderator
2020 Green KRX
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2,080 Posts
okay we are getting way too deep in the weeds here. My head will hurt trying to figure out the TPMS. however, if you are at sea level or 10,000 ft and you have a normal tire pressure gauge, whatever the pressure in the tire is, that's what will read on the gauge
Have not tried with a mechanical gauge, a digital gauge will be off. For me mine is off by 2 psi at my current elevation. Meaning the gauge reads more than what is in the tire.
 
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