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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My wife and I made a trip with some friends to Ouray Colorado this week. We spent three days on the trails around Ouray and Silverton. I wanted to write a short note, with some photos, about our trip. tl;dr:

1. The KRX performed awesome at these high altitudes. I had just installed my Dynojet PV3 tuner, and was a bit worried that it would have issues in the high altitude, but it was great. Ran perfectly the whole time.
2. I've GOT TO GET SOME MUDFLAPS! (See the photos below). I'll probably be ordering the AJ front and rear flares; any other suggestions?
3. I'm relatively new to my KRX, but I'm more in love with it now than ever :)

Trip report:

We are not the most experienced side-by-siders. We had a 2019 RZR XPT which we sold for the KRX earlier this summer. I've driven the RZR around trails in No. Utah, in Ouray two years ago, and in So. Utah, including Moab. I love the technical trails in Moab with obstacles, but it's a tossup whether Moab or Ouray is my favorite place to side-by-side. Ouray is simply amazing. I would highly encourage anybody who's even thinking about going to make the trip. It's breathtaking, the driving is fun, and you get a unique combination of natural beauty and human history (many of the trails in and around Ouray are near mining ruins, which are quite fun to see).

The first day, we drove Minnie Gulch, Maggie Gulch, and Stony Pass near Silverton. It's nearly an hour from Ouray to Silverton on the "Million Dollary Highway" (State Road 550). It's a breathtaking drive, in more ways than one. The natural beauty is amazing, but the road is narrow, twisty, and has sheer drops of hundreds of feet right off the road. Many of the turns require driving about 15 MPH because they are so sharp and danger lurks very close. Just be patient and careful driving that road!

We first rode Maggie Gulch. At the top (37.8135, -107.5364)is an old mill stamping machine that's pretty cool. The pistons are still there, like it's ready to get back to work:
4433


Note: throughout our three days, the wildflowers were simply wonderful. We didn't time it to be so, but they were at their peak during our trip. The snow levels were significantly smaller than our last trip in 2019, but there was still plenty of water everywhere we went. And mud. More on that later.

We then rode Minnie Gulch, where we ate our lunch near a beautiful overlook at 11,100 feet (37.86556, -107.54655). After lunch, it started to rain, and we sought shelter on the road to Stony Pass at the Old Hundred Mine. For around $50-60 you can take a nearly hour-long tour of the still-working mine, and do some panning for gold and silver in a chute behind the mine entrance. Even if you don't take the tour, I recommend going in the building and seeing the things they have on display. On the way up to Stony Pass, we took a detour past Buffalo Boy Mine up Rein Gulch where I took this photo at 13,000 feet (37.81425, -107.55140)
4435


At the top of Stony Pass (37.79475, -107.54767, 12,600 feet), we had to take in the sites quickly, because this is what we saw:

4436


We barely beat the storm down. On the way down, just under Stony Pass, a lightning bolt hit a couple hundred yards away on the ridgeline. There was huge puff of smoke left behind: vaporized rock? We had parked on the main dirt road out of Silverton near the road up to Stony Pass. We got back to the trailers right as the heavens let loose. That was the first day--a total of just over 40 miles and about 6:30 on the trails.

We started day two at the entrance to Corkscrew Gulch (37.93836, -107.67029). This was a long day taking in various trails near the "Alpine Loop." Our waypoints this day included Corkscrew Pass (37.90827, -107.66086), Hurricane Pass (37.92006, -107.62706), Alaska Basin (37.92740, -107.63234), California Gulch (37.93180, -107.58744), and Engineer Pass/Mountain (37.97159, -107.59285). This 45-mile route took around 6:30 to complete. We didn't get rained on this day, but it threatened around us. The views were amazing:

Corkscrew Pass:
4437


Lake Como near Hurricane Pass:

4438


Engineer Mountain:

4439


(You can see here the impact of riding for a day and a half on muddy trails--lots of mud!)

4444


On the way back down, we stopped at the Sound Democrat Mill (37.91244, -107.59554), where they pulverized rock into paste and mixed it with mercury to extract gold. This is a very cool, well-preserved mining site that I highly recommend (a view inside the still-standing building):


4440


At the end of this day, we trailered up to near Black Bear Pass trailhead and rode briefly through the Red Mountain Mining District (near the Yankee Girl Mine) and then up under Ohio Peak (37.86585, -107.70993). This was a total of about 15 miles in 1:30.

We saved the best for last: Imogene Pass, Governer Basin, and Yankee Boy Basin. We started on Camp Bird Road (38.01067, -107.68743) and drove up to the entrance at Imogene Pass (37.97532, -107.74539). I've driven Imogene twice now, and absolutely love it. The beginning of the trail is quite rocky through water, with some tight areas where you hope you don't have to pass anybody. Then you go up toward the pass with some interesting stream crossings and "ledgey" tight trails. The top is bare with a few mildly interesting rock obstacles here and there. From the top, you can look down into Telluride (and ride down and back if you want).

4443


We ate lunch in Governor Basin, then went up Yankee Boy Basin. We had a very interesting experience there, as our party was involved in the rescue of a man who had fallen from the ridge near Mount Sneffels. Some of our party called for help via amateur radio, and others took blankets up to the man where he fell at 13,500 feet near 38.00179, -107.78991. It began to rain and hail--it was the worst hailstorm I'd ever been in. We left behind one of our machines for the two who went up to help the man, and the rest of us made our way down treacherous hail-strewn and flooded roads. It was so bad the search and rescue team, who met us at the trailhead, couldn't go up to help the man until after the storm had passed. Our people with the man at 13,500 feet got caught in the storm and said it was very scary, with more than two inches of hail falling during the storm and lightning hitting the ridge close by. Eventually search and rescue got to the man and brought him down the next day, where he was life-flighted to a hospital. I learned today that he was well and would be released from the hospital soon. Very sobering and scary experience. The mountains at these altitudes in storms can be scary, so be prepared when you go!

To conclude, a happy picture of some of the wildflowers we saw on the trip:
4445


Now, to order those mudflaps!
 

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My wife and I made a trip with some friends to Ouray Colorado this week. We spent three days on the trails around Ouray and Silverton. I wanted to write a short note, with some photos, about our trip. tl;dr:

1. The KRX performed awesome at these high altitudes. I had just installed my Dynojet PV3 tuner, and was a bit worried that it would have issues in the high altitude, but it was great. Ran perfectly the whole time.
2. I've GOT TO GET SOME MUDFLAPS! (See the photos below). I'll probably be ordering the AJ front and rear flares; any other suggestions?
3. I'm relatively new to my KRX, but I'm more in love with it now than ever :)

Trip report:

We are not the most experienced side-by-siders. We had a 2019 RZR XPT which we sold for the KRX earlier this summer. I've driven the RZR around trails in No. Utah, in Ouray two years ago, and in So. Utah, including Moab. I love the technical trails in Moab with obstacles, but it's a tossup whether Moab or Ouray is my favorite place to side-by-side. Ouray is simply amazing. I would highly encourage anybody who's even thinking about going to make the trip. It's breathtaking, the driving is fun, and you get a unique combination of natural beauty and human history (many of the trails in and around Ouray are near mining ruins, which are quite fun to see).

The first day, we drove Minnie Gulch, Maggie Gulch, and Stony Pass near Silverton. It's nearly an hour from Ouray to Silverton on the "Million Dollary Highway" (State Road 550). It's a breathtaking drive, in more ways than one. The natural beauty is amazing, but the road is narrow, twisty, and has sheer drops of hundreds of feet right off the road. Many of the turns require driving about 15 MPH because they are so sharp and danger lurks very close. Just be patient and careful driving that road!

We first rode Maggie Gulch. At the top (37.8135, -107.5364)is an old mill stamping machine that's pretty cool. The pistons are still there, like it's ready to get back to work:
View attachment 4433

Note: throughout our three days, the wildflowers were simply wonderful. We didn't time it to be so, but they were at their peak during our trip. The snow levels were significantly smaller than our last trip in 2019, but there was still plenty of water everywhere we went. And mud. More on that later.

We then rode Minnie Gulch, where we ate our lunch near a beautiful overlook at 11,100 feet (37.86556, -107.54655). After lunch, it started to rain, and we sought shelter on the road to Stony Pass at the Old Hundred Mine. For around $50-60 you can take a nearly hour-long tour of the still-working mine, and do some panning for gold and silver in a chute behind the mine entrance. Even if you don't take the tour, I recommend going in the building and seeing the things they have on display. On the way up to Stony Pass, we took a detour past Buffalo Boy Mine up Rein Gulch where I took this photo at 13,000 feet (37.81425, -107.55140)
View attachment 4435

At the top of Stony Pass (37.79475, -107.54767, 12,600 feet), we had to take in the sites quickly, because this is what we saw:

View attachment 4436

We barely beat the storm down. On the way down, just under Stony Pass, a lightning bolt hit a couple hundred yards away on the ridgeline. There was huge puff of smoke left behind: vaporized rock? We had parked on the main dirt road out of Silverton near the road up to Stony Pass. We got back to the trailers right as the heavens let loose. That was the first day--a total of just over 40 miles and about 6:30 on the trails.

We started day two at the entrance to Corkscrew Gulch (37.93836, -107.67029). This was a long day taking in various trails near the "Alpine Loop." Our waypoints this day included Corkscrew Pass (37.90827, -107.66086), Hurricane Pass (37.92006, -107.62706), Alaska Basin (37.92740, -107.63234), California Gulch (37.93180, -107.58744), and Engineer Pass/Mountain (37.97159, -107.59285). This 45-mile route took around 6:30 to complete. We didn't get rained on this day, but it threatened around us. The views were amazing:

Corkscrew Pass:
View attachment 4437

Lake Como near Hurricane Pass:

View attachment 4438

Engineer Mountain:

View attachment 4439

(You can see here the impact of riding for a day and a half on muddy trails--lots of mud!)

View attachment 4444

On the way back down, we stopped at the Sound Democrat Mill (37.91244, -107.59554), where they pulverized rock into paste and mixed it with mercury to extract gold. This is a very cool, well-preserved mining site that I highly recommend (a view inside the still-standing building):


View attachment 4440

At the end of this day, we trailered up to near Black Bear Pass trailhead and rode briefly through the Red Mountain Mining District (near the Yankee Girl Mine) and then up under Ohio Peak (37.86585, -107.70993). This was a total of about 15 miles in 1:30.

We saved the best for last: Imogene Pass, Governer Basin, and Yankee Boy Basin. We started on Camp Bird Road (38.01067, -107.68743) and drove up to the entrance at Imogene Pass (37.97532, -107.74539). I've driven Imogene twice now, and absolutely love it. The beginning of the trail is quite rocky through water, with some tight areas where you hope you don't have to pass anybody. Then you go up toward the pass with some interesting stream crossings and "ledgey" tight trails. The top is bare with a few mildly interesting rock obstacles here and there. From the top, you can look down into Telluride (and ride down and back if you want).

View attachment 4443

We ate lunch in Governor Basin, then went up Yankee Boy Basin. We had a very interesting experience there, as our party was involved in the rescue of a man who had fallen from the ridge near Mount Sneffels. Some of our party called for help via amateur radio, and others took blankets up to the man where he fell at 13,500 feet near 38.00179, -107.78991. It began to rain and hail--it was the worst hailstorm I'd ever been in. We left behind one of our machines for the two who went up to help the man, and the rest of us made our way down treacherous hail-strewn and flooded roads. It was so bad the search and rescue team, who met us at the trailhead, couldn't go up to help the man until after the storm had passed. Our people with the man at 13,500 feet got caught in the storm and said it was very scary, with more than two inches of hail falling during the storm and lightning hitting the ridge close by. Eventually search and rescue got to the man and brought him down the next day, where he was life-flighted to a hospital. I learned today that he was well and would be released from the hospital soon. Very sobering and scary experience. The mountains at these altitudes in storms can be scary, so be prepared when you go!

To conclude, a happy picture of some of the wildflowers we saw on the trip:
View attachment 4445

Now, to order those mudflaps!
Thanks so much for sharing. Super cool. My wife read over the thread and checked out the pictures a few different times last night.
We want to haul our KRX out to Colorado some time...its on the bucket list for sure!
 

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Awesome! That is not only some of the most beautiful country in Colorado, it's some of the most beautiful country anywhere. The history of the area is fascinating as well. Heading down there next August for several days of riding.
The afternoon thunder storms (almost daily) in the high country here are no joke. A person literally needs to be prepared for anything from rain to hail to snow to high temperatures when they go up. You can experience all four conditions in one day of riding, so be prepared.
AJ's fender flares are a great choice. I just got the fronts for mine since that's where 95% of the mud in the cab comes from. Thought about adding some extra length on the bottom of mine but don't ride enough mud to motivate me to do it... :) A few rivets and a couple pieces of mud flap material is all it would take.
 

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I have been going there since I was 5. About 1980. Changed alot since then. Majorly in last 5 years. Totally switched from predominantly jeeps to now SXS. Will be my first year with my KRX. Loved taking my can am years past. Staying in Silverton is great if you get a place on OHV route so no trailering for 90% of the trails!
 

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Great write up. The storms make for shitty riding but great pictures in the mountains.

Where do you normally ride that you call that muddy? I hate mud but around here if I get out that clean I'm pretty happy. We have more mud than that on road rides.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Great write up. The storms make for shitty riding but great pictures in the mountains.

Where do you normally ride that you call that muddy? I hate mud but around here if I get out that clean I'm pretty happy. We have more mud than that on road rides.
I ride in the West--Utah and occasionally Colorado. That's muddy for me! I understand the East Coast and perhaps the Pacific Northwest is, well, actually really muddy :)
 
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