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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2021 krx 1000 and The brakes suck! It only has three hours on it driven around my yard. I can push it to the floor and it won’t even skid the tires in the dirt. I’ve tried bleeding them still feel spongy. Any thoughts?
 

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2021 Blue Kawasaki KRX
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I would take it back to the dealer and have them check out the cause. The brakes on the KRX are a little lacking but they should lock up on dirt.
 

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I have a 2021 krx 1000 and The brakes suck! It only has three hours on it driven around my yard. I can push it to the floor and it won’t even skid the tires in the dirt. I’ve tried bleeding them still feel spongy. Any thoughts?
Where are you located and how much do you want for that POS?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I would take it back to the dealer and have them check out the cause. The brakes on the KRX are a little lacking but they should lock up on dirt.
I feel like the slave cylinder is to little for the Machine comparing it to my car. I have manual drum brakes on my 67 camaro and I can still lock them up.
 

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2020 Kawasaki KRX
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There is a lot of information out there about the KRX brakes. They require some riding time and break in, just like the rest of the machine. The brakes are plenty good enough on these machines, nothing is too small or under designed.
With just 3 hours on it, I would either put some more miles/hours on it and see if it gets better, or just take it in and have it looked at.
 

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I’ve done a lot of reading and missed anything about the brakes. This is the first I’ve heard that. Thanks.
 

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2020 KRX
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Burnishing the brakes is very important. I wish Kawi would do a better job addressing it in the break in procedure.
 

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Burnishing the brakes is very important. I wish Kawi would do a better job addressing it in the break in procedure.
That would be nice for the few that actually read through the manual. So many just go to social media and get the ever popular "Just ride it like you stole it" response when they ask about break in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I will try this weekend and see what happen. this is my only complaint machine is awesome.
 

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The breaks are perfect on a working machine. I can lock them up on dirt, hard pack, or street. If your breaks go to the floor, you either have air in the lines still, or a bad master cylinder. Also check to see if one of the brake disc are bent.
 

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I will try this weekend and see what happen. this is my only complaint machine is awesome.
As with any fresh brake job, you need to properly "wear" the pads in. The worst thing you can do is over heat them trying to rush the process. As long as the pedal is not sinking to the floor, you should be fine. Just ride for the first day and let them wear-in and you'll be fine. Funny story on that subject. When I first brought my machine home, my wife wanted to pull it off the trailer...You should have seen the look on her face when she tried to stop after rolling it off. Her eyes were like saucers! LOL! Today, I can say that this thing has absolutely no issues locking up. The brake system design is fine for this machine.
 

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2020 KRX 1000
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As yours is brand new, get the pad material to seat onto the brake rotor by getting them hot...........get up to 40 mph, and stomp on the brakes to 0....about 5 times in a row. That will help seat the friction material and they should work better.
It's called beading the brakes and that is not how to do it. That will cause the pads to form a glaze on there surface and reduce friction. Opposite of what you want. Normal driving and braking will "bead" them properly. If they continue to not stop the machine replace them and lightly machine the rotors with a DA sander 180 grit.
 

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I'll stick with my technique, as that is how all my Porsches get bedded in before a track day. you WANT that glazed pad material on your rotor.



Bedding In Brake Rotors

Anytime you install new brake rotors, brake pads, or both, it's advantageous to bed in your new brakes. Bedding in your brakes is just an industry term to explain breaking in your new brakes. Bedding in your brakes helps transfer an even layer of brake pad material onto the brake rotor which assists in smoother brake operation and improved braking power.

Having a uniform layer of pad material on the brake rotor is essential to minimizing brake squeal and vibration. For this procedure, you will need a good stretch of road and no traffic.

Use common sense and take precaution as BrakePerformance does not take responsibility for erratic driving, accidents, or damages done.

Note: When using Brake Performance Zinc-Coated rotors, as soon as you start braking, the friction from the pads will strip the zinc from the pad surface, turning it Silver and leaving the holes, slots, and the rest of the rotor zinc coated in the color you selected.

  • Perform 3-4 medium stops from 45mph. Slightly more aggressive than normal braking. You don't need to come to a complete stop for each pass. This brings the brake rotors up to temperature so they are not exposed to sudden thermal shock.
  • Make 8-10 aggressive stops from 60mph down to 15mph. For this set of semi-stops, you want to be firm and aggressive, but not to the point where ABS activates and the wheels lock up. It's important to note that you don't come to a complete stop but rather a semi-stop (~15mph). Accelerate back up to 60mph as soon as you slowed down to your semi-stop.
  • The brake pads and brake rotors are extremely hot at this point and sitting on one point will imprint the pad material onto the surface unevenly. This can cause vibration and uneven braking.
  • You may notice that your brakes will start fading, and sometimes smoke, after the 6th or 7th pass. This fade will stabilize and will gradually recess once your brakes have cooled down to normal operating temperatures. Drive carefully as your brakes may feel softer for the next few minutes.
  • Try not to come to a complete stop and find a stretch of road where you can coast for 5-10 minutes, preferably without using your brakes.
After the break-in procedure, there may be a light blue tint on your brake rotors as well as a gray film deposit. The blue tint shows that your rotor has reached the appropriate temperature during the bedding process, and the gray film is some of the pad transfer material.
 

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2021 KRX 1000, 2016 Wildcat Sport, 2018 Ram 3500 and 2016 XLR305V12 toy hauler
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Both are right. The important part is to determine what the manufacture wants for the specific brake compound being used (Kawasaki not very transparent there). Not every brake pad is made the same and will require its own bedding/burnishing procedure. I run the fleet for our local sheriff so yes brakes are a big part of my life. I agree that driving around the yard easy will not even get moderate heat in the pads. Hopefully the OP got some time to try to put some heat in them and get some confidence in the brakes. I definitely do not feel that the master cylinder is the issue.



It's called beading the brakes and that is not how to do it. That will cause the pads to form a glaze on there surface and reduce friction. Opposite of what you want. Normal driving and braking will "bead" them properly. If they continue to not stop the machine replace them and lightly machine the rotors with a DA sander 180 grit.
I'll stick with my technique, as that is how all my Porsches get bedded in before a track day. you WANT that glazed pad material on your rotor.



Bedding In Brake Rotors

Anytime you install new brake rotors, brake pads, or both, it's advantageous to bed in your new brakes. Bedding in your brakes is just an industry term to explain breaking in your new brakes. Bedding in your brakes helps transfer an even layer of brake pad material onto the brake rotor which assists in smoother brake operation and improved braking power.

Having a uniform layer of pad material on the brake rotor is essential to minimizing brake squeal and vibration. For this procedure, you will need a good stretch of road and no traffic.

Use common sense and take precaution as BrakePerformance does not take responsibility for erratic driving, accidents, or damages done.

Note: When using Brake Performance Zinc-Coated rotors, as soon as you start braking, the friction from the pads will strip the zinc from the pad surface, turning it Silver and leaving the holes, slots, and the rest of the rotor zinc coated in the color you selected.

  • Perform 3-4 medium stops from 45mph. Slightly more aggressive than normal braking. You don't need to come to a complete stop for each pass. This brings the brake rotors up to temperature so they are not exposed to sudden thermal shock.
  • Make 8-10 aggressive stops from 60mph down to 15mph. For this set of semi-stops, you want to be firm and aggressive, but not to the point where ABS activates and the wheels lock up. It's important to note that you don't come to a complete stop but rather a semi-stop (~15mph). Accelerate back up to 60mph as soon as you slowed down to your semi-stop.
  • The brake pads and brake rotors are extremely hot at this point and sitting on one point will imprint the pad material onto the surface unevenly. This can cause vibration and uneven braking.
  • You may notice that your brakes will start fading, and sometimes smoke, after the 6th or 7th pass. This fade will stabilize and will gradually recess once your brakes have cooled down to normal operating temperatures. Drive carefully as your brakes may feel softer for the next few minutes.
  • Try not to come to a complete stop and find a stretch of road where you can coast for 5-10 minutes, preferably without using your brakes.
After the break-in procedure, there may be a light blue tint on your brake rotors as well as a gray film deposit. The blue tint shows that your rotor has reached the appropriate temperature during the bedding process, and the gray film is some of the pad transfer material.
 

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