Kawasaki KRX Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know this has been discussed, but can't remember the thread title. My right hand front tire is now at a more extreme angle than the front left (300 miles). The steering wheel is no longer clocked correctly, it angles towards the right tire when the tires are pointed straight ahead, is this related? Is it something I can/should correct?
 

·
Premium Member
2020 KRX
Joined
·
1,209 Posts
Sounds like you need to adjust your Toe-in/out. Watch the video below to help you do it up yourself.
 

·
Registered
2021 Blue Kawasaki KRX
Joined
·
40 Posts
As the springs settle and lose ride height, the front wheels will gain more negative camber and will lean in more at the top of the wheel.
Maybe this is what you are experiencing on your ride. May need to re-adjust your ride height or think about getting aftermarket springs.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Johnk

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
the steering wheel is splined, just pulled the center cover off and re-clock your wheel.
My first reaction is that the steering wheel was straight at 169 miles, at 230 it wasn't, seems like there would be a mechanical cause. The post after yours mentioned sagging springs as a possible issue, I didn't think this would be an issue so soon, my Wildcat 4 still has good springs after 6 years and 2500 miles, often with 4 passengers. I weigh 168, my wife 122, not a lot of weight to cause an issue.

Nevertheless, is the negative camber adjustable, and if so, I should do that (or adjust ride height) before I re-clock the steering wheel?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
My first reaction is that the steering wheel was straight at 169 miles, at 230 it wasn't, seems like there would be a mechanical cause. The post after yours mentioned sagging springs as a possible issue, I didn't think this would be an issue so soon, my Wildcat 4 still has good springs after 6 years and 2500 miles, often with 4 passengers. I weigh 168, my wife 122, not a lot of weight to cause an issue.

Nevertheless, is the negative camber adjustable, and if so, I should do that (or adjust ride height) before I re-clock the steering wheel?
Camber is not adjustable with stock A-arms. Toe in/out is the only adjustable component, and needed adjusted (re-aligned) after I changed out to the updated steering knuckles. Obvious indication of a misalignment issue is the steering wheel as you have noticed. I'd check the tie rods to make sure nothing is loose or bent. Shock Therapy has a video explaining how to do your own alignment. That's where I'd start.
 

·
Super Moderator
2020 Kawasaki KRX
Joined
·
1,400 Posts
My first reaction is that the steering wheel was straight at 169 miles, at 230 it wasn't, seems like there would be a mechanical cause. The post after yours mentioned sagging springs as a possible issue, I didn't think this would be an issue so soon, my Wildcat 4 still has good springs after 6 years and 2500 miles, often with 4 passengers. I weigh 168, my wife 122, not a lot of weight to cause an issue.

Nevertheless, is the negative camber adjustable, and if so, I should do that (or adjust ride height) before I re-clock the steering wheel?
The springs can sag out in just a couple hundred miles. Almost all OEM springs will. I added preload to mine after losing about 1-1/2" of ground clearance. Couple hundred more miles and I had lost about 1/2". Adjusted preload again, and they seem to be holding steady now for a couple hundred miles. I will be going to Shock Therapy springs when I decide it's time to spend money on springs.
There is no camber adjustment unless you go with aftermarket a-arms. No need for that, and over time you will quit looking at it all the time. :)
 

·
Registered
2020 KRX 1000
Joined
·
9 Posts
The springs can sag out in just a couple hundred miles. Almost all OEM springs will. I added preload to mine after losing about 1-1/2" of ground clearance. Couple hundred more miles and I had lost about 1/2". Adjusted preload again, and they seem to be holding steady now for a couple hundred miles. I will be going to Shock Therapy springs when I decide it's time to spend money on springs.
There is no camber adjustment unless you go with aftermarket a-arms. No need for that, and over time you will quit looking at it all the time. :)
Just finished my Shock therapy spring install.
Best money you'll spend on the krx. The ride and handling is noticeable better. It's restored my ride height after the stock springs could no longer support the added weight of the winch, cooler full of beer and the tree kickers.
2621
 

·
Super Moderator
2020 Kawasaki KRX
Joined
·
1,400 Posts
Just finished my Shock therapy spring install.
Best money you'll spend on the krx. The ride and handling is noticeable better. It's restored my ride height after the stock springs could no longer support the added weight of the winch, cooler full of beer and the tree kickers.
I've decided I'm going to just replace the tender springs if/when Right Coast ever gets them in and sends them to me. Starting to wonder if it's ever going to happen. They keep saying their manufacturer is about ready to get them out, but been hearing that for a couple of months now. I really don't think there is any issue with the OEM lower spring so I don't see any reason to replace them at this point.
 

·
Registered
2021 Blue KRX 1000
Joined
·
317 Posts
Going to take mine in for the popping out of gear issue and have them readjust the preload. Just waiting for an opening. After the springs settle again, I'll replace them. With what I don't know yet...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
Just finished my Shock therapy spring install.
Best money you'll spend on the krx. The ride and handling is noticeable better. It's restored my ride height after the stock springs could no longer support the added weight of the winch, cooler full of beer and the tree kickers. View attachment 2621
Those are interesting looking tires
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top