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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I’m still new to sport side by sides but an old hand at farm equipment maintenance, so I figured on doing the services myself. Long story short, I pulled 'er in the shop at 120 miles and spent the morning doing the first service, making a few observations along the way:
1. Use 6 sided sockets.
2. The PT W54075 fits the OEM filter just fine.
3. When loosening things for the first time, slow and steady saves the day.
4. If it has a torque value, use a torque wrench.
5. I pulled the skid plate to drain the engine oil. Won't do that again.....
6. I opted to drain everything and then refill. Others may focus on one component at a time. Do what works for you.
7. Refilling the final drive and transmission was a snap using this little gem. Screws right on to quart jugs (gallon, too) and has a twist on/off function. Quick and clean.
8. I used OEM stuff.
9. Finish with all the tools you started with.

Still need to pull the belt cover and check torque on the beadlock rings, lug nuts and shock mounts. I did everything a reputable shop would have done and more. It did take some time, but the quantum leap in familiarity was well worth it. Nothing compares to knowing something was done right because you did it yourself. I figure I'll do one more dino change and then switch to synthetics.
 

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Great contribution!!!
I’m sure you found fluid changes on a KRX to be very simple and straightforward. Everything is super easy to access. Not like a Wolverine.

Nice tip on that spout with that long tube!
I’ll order one:

The CVT cover is easy to pull with the right tools. I use a swivel socket adapter in between an extension with the 10 mm socket. If you get a 10 mm swivel socket that would be the ticket. Removing the belt cover and blowing out the dust is something that needs to be done regularly. I’d say 200 miles for sure, bad conditions more frequently. I’m anal about maintenance.

Once the bolts are out the cover rotates down and forwards. It took me a while to figure out but once you do it, it’s fast.

Have fun!!!
 
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Oh on the bead locks I’d say they need retorqued three times in the first 50-75 miles. On mine after that they settled in and were spot on. But if you’re not leaking air, it’s ok.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Not like a Wolverine.
Copy that. I had everything done on the KRX in the amount of time it would have taken to drain and re-fill the front diff on the Wolverine. The extra ground clearance and generous fill openings helped, too. Good idea on the swivel adapter, I don't use them much. When I checked the beadlock rings on day 1, it didn't dawn on me that they might have been over torqued. Same with the shock mounts. I think I'll back them off and re-do them in accordance with the service manual.
 
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A set of 4 ramps will make the fluid change part exponentially easier.....especially if you have bad knees, shoulders etc. That extra 6" of lift makes things a lot easier to get to. A five gallon bucket has that extra clearance for catching fluids. draining.
4608
 

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There's another thread here where we talked about brakes where Jraoffroad said you can monitor the brake fluid reservoir to indicate brake pad life. I found this to be true. My reservoir was at the minimum level. At the end of my story it was about 3/4 full. I attribute the 1/4 to the front pads which I did not change. Here's my story on my first KRX brake job.

Yesterday at 1100 miles I pulled the wheels to check my brakes more thoroughly. I rotated my tires before the last ride and knew I needed pads so I ordered them and then did that Sanderson ride.

Wow, such a joy to work on these brakes, nothing like the Wolverine X2. On a KRX it takes longer to remove the wheels than it does to change the brake pads.

I used this video for training:

His YouTube channel has the flip over:

Anyway, the front brakes are super easy! Take an 8mm hex hey and remove the lower caliper slide bolt. Rotate the caliper up and THERE ARE THE PADS! Mine were at 50%, this is at 1100 miles total and 980 miles on 35" tires where my wheels weigh around 65-70 lbs each. So I reinstalled the front pads.

The rears are almost as easy, the difference is the parking brake. Take an 8mm hex hey and remove the lower caliper slide bolt. Use a 5mm hex key to remove a bolt on the parking brake lever. Now rotate the caliper up - watch the video, you have to fight it a little - and then slide the entire caliper off. THERE ARE THE PADS! Mine were gone, one was metal to metal but I caught it all in time.

I went back with these pads from Jake:
Kawasaki KRX 1000 EPI Front Brake Pad Kit (4) WE445423 [we445423] - $69.99 : Marked Motorsports, Team Website

Kawasaki KRX 1000 EPI Rear Brake Pad Kit (4) WE445424 [we445424] - $69.99 : Marked Motorsports, Team Website

The OEM pads are $400 a complete set. I decided to try these. I'll keep you informed as to how they hold up. My Wolverine X2 goes through rear pads 2 to 1 compared to fronts so I ordered another set of rear pads from Jake.

Oh, and here is Jake:
 
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