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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I went for a Thursday-Sunday ride this past weekend. 2020 Krx- 964 miles. I unloaded it Thursday afternoon and setup camp. Went for a little ride and it overheated twice. I shut it down a few miles deep when I noticed the temp at 226. I was letting it cool when I decided to cycle the ignition on and look at temp again - hoping it was some fluke- when I did this I could hear my fan coming on and off which obviously shouldn’t be the case - I climbed in and watched it- it never reached full rpm and would cycle on and off. I made a post in FB and had numerous replies to replace the fan that they had issues……one person had replaced there fan and sent ea not because on his second fan failure he thought it wasn’t the fan itself. In the fuse panel for the fan is a long “mini breaker” fuse that in my opinion either over heated or just wire out and was limiting voltage to fan…..i limped back to camp and put in a regular fuse and it ran fine the next 2 days…….. so if you have fan issues with it not starting on and at full rpm - try changing the fuse- 50 cent fix versus a new fan and down time.
 

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Good to know, thanks for the tip.
 

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The fans do have known issues with the magnets breaking loose in the housing.

I’d like to know why they have that “special” fuse in there? Anybody know what type of fuse that is? Is it some kind of thermal fuse?🤔
 

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The fans do have known issues with the magnets breaking loose in the housing.

I’d like to know why they have that “special” fuse in there? Anybody know what type of fuse that is? Is it some kind of thermal fuse?🤔
That is a automotive circuit breaker. When the electrical circuit reaches a overload condition there is a bimetallic spring inside which has a electrical contact on it which is one of two inline of the power source and when the spring gets hot from a circuit overload the spring bends and the contact moves away from the other contact and the electrical power source is interrupted. When the spring cools down the contacts come together and the circuit is completed and the power source will resume. Sometimes the contacts get corroded from electrical arcing and then the contacts will not let full voltage pass through them and that is when the circuit breaker needs to be replaced.
 

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That is a automotive circuit breaker. When the electrical circuit reaches a overload condition there is a bimetallic spring inside which has a electrical contact on it which is one of two inline of the power source and when the spring gets hot from a circuit overload the spring bends and the contact moves away from the other contact and the electrical power source is interrupted. When the spring cools down the contacts come together and the circuit is completed and the power source will resume. Sometimes the contacts get corroded from electrical arcing and then the contacts will not let full voltage pass through them and that is when the circuit breaker needs to be replaced.
Thanks for the explanation.

So it’s more of a circuit breaker then a fuse? So what, if any, harm can be done by replacing it with a standard fuse?
 

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Thanks for the explanation.

So it’s more of a circuit breaker then a fuse? So what, if any, harm can be done by replacing it with a standard fuse?
A lot of electric motors have a thermal overload device built in to prevent overheat damage that can be caused by a number of different conditions. An example would be a locked rotor that could be cause by debris preventing fan movement and overheating the motor. The device resets itself as a convenience if it is not deemed a "critical must look at" condition by the designer. This circuit breaker is most likely used to perform that function. Replacing it with a higher amperage fuse would allow the fan to operate out of it's safe thermal envelope and perhaps damage it. I would use it as a temporary fix and try a new replacement circuit breaker as Kawasaki put it there for a good reason.
 

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Thanks for the explanation.

So it’s more of a circuit breaker then a fuse? So what, if any, harm can be done by replacing it with a standard fuse?
There is one shot of circuit overload with a standard fuse then the circuit will not work and with the circuit breaker it can be overloaded many times without you even knowing it.
They can become weak after many times of cycling. There are different amperages of circuit breakers just like fuses. Manufactures install circuit breakers in electrical circuits that are prone to overload.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That is a automotive circuit breaker. When the electrical circuit reaches a overload condition there is a bimetallic spring inside which has a electrical contact on it which is one of two inline of the power source and when the spring gets hot from a circuit overload the spring bends and the contact moves away from the other contact and the electrical power source is interrupted. When the spring cools down the contacts come together and the circuit is completed and the power source will resume. Sometimes the contacts get corroded from electrical arcing and then the contacts will not let full voltage pass through them and that is when the circuit breaker needs to be replaced.
Good info - I wasnt familiar with that type fuse - let me ask the stupid question - no other sxs uses this on a fan - why would you use this instead of a regular fuse for a fan? I appreciate the explanation and based on your description that was exactly the issue - any disadvantage to running a regular fuse? should I replace it with another oem fuse?
 

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Good info - I wasnt familiar with that type fuse - let me ask the stupid question - no other sxs uses this on a fan - why would you use this instead of a regular fuse for a fan? I appreciate the explanation and based on your description that was exactly the issue - any disadvantage to running a regular fuse? should I replace it with another oem fuse?
The advantage of using a circuit breaker of course is that the circuit breaker can cycle on and off if there is a circuit overload and the fan will cycle on and off. With using a standard fuse in that location like I stated before if indeed there is a circuit overload when the fuse is blown the circuit will not work again until the fuse is replaced. I can't tell you why the Kawasaki engineers decided to use a circuit breaker for the fan but it is a great idea to do in my opinion for obvious reasons. I would replace the circuit breaker with the same buss part number and amperage (which is 15 amps) and then see how the fan circuit operates then as I think you currently have a bad or over cycled circuit breaker which happens some times. I believe if you had a problem in the fan circuit the current fuse that you are using would have failed already. There is no such thing as a stupid question. That is how we all learn.
 

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Good info - I wasnt familiar with that type fuse - let me ask the stupid question - no other sxs uses this on a fan - why would you use this instead of a regular fuse for a fan? I appreciate the explanation and based on your description that was exactly the issue - any disadvantage to running a regular fuse? should I replace it with another oem fuse?
Polaris uses them on the fan circuit on the RZR. Yamaha uses one on their SXS also. Not sure on other makes.
 

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I'm pretty sure if you start to overheat a check engine light will come on, then shortly after that you will smell coolant.
 

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The light for the fan running is a great idea even if you’re not deaf. I think it’s as simple as tapping in to the wires right at the fan. Take the two of them back to a 12 vdc light.
 

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The fans do have known issues with the magnets breaking loose in the housing.

I’d like to know why they have that “special” fuse in there? Anybody know what type of fuse that is? Is it some kind of thermal fuse?🤔
I had the same problem , Kawasaki couldn’t fix it . I replaced the mini breaker and fixed the problem . I also insulated the fire wall area of the fuse box . Haven’t had any more problems . I bought my breaker at Napa auto parts .
 
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