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2020 Kawasaki KRX
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking for some fellow KRX owners to do me a favor. After a short ride, go and see if your rear CV axles and joints are hot. I've never checked mine before until I did a spring replacement and it increased the axle angle a bit. The fronts don't seem to build any heat, but the rears get hot. It may be totally normal but I never thought to check them before...
Thanks
 

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2020 KRX
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Get yourself a grease needle and pack em up good with grease. You can put a dab of silicone or liquid gasket on the pinhole you made in the boot.
 

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Get yourself a grease needle and pack em up good with grease. You can put a dab of silicone or liquid gasket on the pinhole you made in the boot.
i will most respectfully disagree on this one.... they're assembled with all of the correct grade and type of grease they should ever need, in fact some off the shelf grease's might not be compatable with the grease used on the cv joints..... and to put any small hole in the cv boot (especially what we term the 'plastic' ones) is now a sure way to get the grease inside to leak out and the elements- dirt and water- to get in. if the joints are heating up then they might not have any grease in them at all (highly unlikely) and pumping grease in to the boot won't do much to get in into the heart of the cv joint itself with proper grease.... pumping the boot full of grease can also cause it to blow out sooner if you overfill the boot with grease. if it's suspected that the cv joints need to be re-packed then buy a cv boot kit (factory is best on this one) and do it right- and you'll want to inspect them anyways if you do suspect they were ran dry as a cv joint is a interference fit device and if they were ran dry, then they wear alot and will get loose and start 'clicking' under acceleration.

bob, the heat you may be feeling may be heat transfer because the rear joints are attached to the engine/trans which is hot, and the front ones run in the front diff which runs cool by comparison.
 

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2020 KRX
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i will most respectfully disagree on this one.... they're assembled with all of the correct grade and type of grease they should ever need, in fact some off the shelf grease's might not be compatable with the grease used on the cv joints..... and to put any small hole in the cv boot (especially what we term the 'plastic' ones) is now a sure way to get the grease inside to leak out and the elements- dirt and water- to get in. if the joints are heating up then they might not have any grease in them at all (highly unlikely) and pumping grease in to the boot won't do much to get in into the heart of the cv joint itself with proper grease.... pumping the boot full of grease can also cause it to blow out sooner if you overfill the boot with grease. if it's suspected that the cv joints need to be re-packed then buy a cv boot kit (factory is best on this one) and do it right- and you'll want to inspect them anyways if you do suspect they were ran dry as a cv joint is a interference fit device and if they were ran dry, then they wear alot and will get loose and start 'clicking' under acceleration.

bob, the heat you may be feeling may be heat transfer because the rear joints are attached to the engine/trans which is hot, and the front ones run in the front diff which runs cool by comparison.
To each his own. To rely on the factory to put the proper amount of grease on the joints is, IMO, foolish. We seen a ton of mistakes coming out of the factory and the dealerships as well. I’m assuming Bob would be smart enough to put the proper grease in the gun before applying.
I’ve been greasing my off-road toys for years doing the way I suggested, and never had a leak or dirt penetrate the boot. 🤷‍♂️
 

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@BobX2 one of our KRX's does the same. Rear CV's get crazy hot. Swapped our for our Rhino 2.0's to see if there would be any difference, and same thing. Haven't had any issues, but its hot for sure. The other rig's CV's get pretty warm, but not as bad.

I brought it to a few guys in the shop, and they didn't think it was going to be an issue. Good to have this thread for future reference...just in case.
 

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To each his own. To rely on the factory to put the proper amount of grease on the joints is, IMO, foolish. We seen a ton of mistakes coming out of the factory and the dealerships as well. I’m assuming Bob would be smart enough to put the proper grease in the gun before applying.
I’ve been greasing my off-road toys for years doing the way I suggested, and never had a leak or dirt penetrate the boot. 🤷‍♂️
So do you repack your cv axles when you buy a new car, before driving it?? Or rely on factory to put the proper amount in them. Just wondering....
 

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More than likely it is the heat transfer from the transmission. I don't think it will be an issue unless the cv boots start to fail. More than likely they use graphite grease in the joints. Most Japanese manufacturers of automobiles have graphite grease and have done plenty of boot replacements on them.
 

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So do you repack your cv axles when you buy a new car, before driving it?? Or rely on factory to put the proper amount in them. Just wondering....
I don’t subject my personal vehicles to the same environment that my toys are in, but if I did, then yes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
@BobX2 one of our KRX's does the same. Rear CV's get crazy hot. Swapped our for our Rhino 2.0's to see if there would be any difference, and same thing. Haven't had any issues, but its hot for sure. The other rig's CV's get pretty warm, but not as bad.

I brought it to a few guys in the shop, and they didn't think it was going to be an issue. Good to have this thread to reference in the future...just in case.
Ah, finally, an answer. Thank you much! I figured it was a normal thing, especially after they got hot after lowering the ride height to factory height settings. Just didn't want to run into an issue when I head up to the Black Hills for a week. Just one of those things that I had never thought about checking before.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Get yourself a grease needle and pack em up good with grease. You can put a dab of silicone or liquid gasket on the pinhole you made in the boot.
I've heard of many folks doing this in the past, and haven't heard any of them saying it caused any issues. However, I just have an aversion to poking a hole in a sealed joint. Not something that I would really consider doing, but thanks.
 

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I've heard of many folks doing this in the past, and haven't heard any of them saying it caused any issues. However, I just have an aversion to poking a hole in a sealed joint. Not something that I would really consider doing, but thanks.
Nobody puts a hole in the boot to grease when u can pop a clamp off and grease and reclamp unless some crazy racing... Too much grease is as bad as not enough. Too much causes cooling issues. IR the CV's, not touch. 250 max degs is fine. Rear diff and brake heat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
As long as I can touch it, I'm fine then. 250 degrees would burn. If I run across an IR sometime, I will check it with that if I'm still concerned about it. Sounds like there are no worries. :)
 

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I chased this issue on my pioneer.. good luck!
I would think that running in two wheel drive,the rear cvs would absolutely get hotter than the fronts,their working to power the machine down the road.the fronts are just floating
 

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Asked the better half to bring a thermal camera home from the shop today. It should tell me exactly how hot my rears get for reference. If I can get the camera software downloaded and working up here at home, I'll post some heat map pictures with spot temps.
 

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ya'll are putting way too much effort into this issue.... how many of you have ever checked the cv joint heat on your passenger car after a 20 minute drive? guess what? the inner joint is always hotter than the outter joint because its attached to the transaxle.... which....wait for it.... is hot also. the only difference on our KRX's is the fact that you can run it hard, bring it to a stop and within seconds reach in and grab the inner joint because there's nothing much in the way. sometimes just get in and drive, enjoy the scenery. if you get an IR camera on it what then? what's the spec? what's it supposed to look like? if the transmission case is a different temp could that be caused by the fact that it's aluminum that sheds heat more easily and the cv is steel which retains heat longer? the cv also has a stub on it that extends into the center of the diff where it can pickup heat easier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
ya'll are putting way too much effort into this issue.... how many of you have ever checked the cv joint heat on your passenger car after a 20 minute drive? guess what? the inner joint is always hotter than the outter joint because its attached to the transaxle.... which....wait for it.... is hot also. the only difference on our KRX's is the fact that you can run it hard, bring it to a stop and within seconds reach in and grab the inner joint because there's nothing much in the way. sometimes just get in and drive, enjoy the scenery. if you get an IR camera on it what then? what's the spec? what's it supposed to look like? if the transmission case is a different temp could that be caused by the fact that it's aluminum that sheds heat more easily and the cv is steel which retains heat longer? the cv also has a stub on it that extends into the center of the diff where it can pickup heat easier.
LOL It was just a concern to me because I had never grabbed a cv joint after running it before. The first time I did was after changing the angle of the axles due to new springs. When I felt how hot they were I figured I would ask the question about it and educate myself a little to see if I had caused it with the extra angle they were running at. Simple as that.
 

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Operation

A CV joint may operate efficiently up to 80° deviation from a straight line. By operating in pairs, larger angles are possible. The effective life of a CV joint will generally be shortened as joint angle increases. CV joints are effective for high velocity power transmission where operating angles are acute. CV joints tend to be heavier and more expensive than universal joints and tend to fail more quickly.

Joints can even achieve short-term peaks up to 160°C (320* F)
 
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