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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So I wake up this morning and see a video recommendation on YT on how to change you spark plugs on a KRX...basic knowledge for some but I watched anyways. In the comment someone had mentioned to put anti seize on the spark plugs and the OP of the video said solid advice!!!! DON'T DO THAT... Its not solid advice and can seriously damage your engine.
 

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Although we don't do it, and ngk doesn't recommend it, it isn't dangerous as long as you realize it acts as a lubricant and can make it very easy to over tighten the plug. We were more referring to the dielectric grease on the plug caps comment as being solid advice......tough crowd in the comments of youtube videos these days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's actually very dangerous because there is no way to gage how to tight to get the plug using it throws off tightening by 20 to 30% so...to loose gonna blow a plug out...to tight gonna break the plug or strip the head. As far as tough crowd goes...to many inexperienced non mechanic people watching your videos for good advice and how to's ...not to point out the damage that can happen when using it. I enjoy your channel for the upgrades and your thoughts on performance add ons. It's bad advice and should be pointed out it's not needed or advised. Different story if it's a lawn mower engine ... Even then I wouldn't do it but to each is own
 

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It's actually very dangerous because there is no way to gage how to tight to get the plug using it throws off tightening by 20 to 30% so...to loose gonna blow a plug out...to tight gonna break the plug or strip the head. As far as tough crowd goes...to many inexperienced non mechanic people watching your videos for good advice and how to's ...not to point out the damage that can happen when using it. I enjoy your channel for the upgrades and your thoughts on performance add ons. It's bad advice and should be pointed out it's not needed or advised. Different story if it's a lawn mower engine ... Even then I wouldn't do it but to each is own
I stand corrected and did not know NGK specifically states not to use anti sieze. Personally I've always used a small dab out of a tube on the beginning of threads to keep from gualing the threads on aluminum. I've been a mechanic over 30. Everything from heavy equipment to motorcycles. Yes I've learned something from NGK. Plus I've always torqued every spark plug and glow plug I've changed. When you stop learning something new from an ever changing trade is when I'll quit. Thank you for correcting my mistake.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
As an HD mechanic and builder of many engines I'm totally onboard with with using dielectric grease on the cap for moisture purposes so that was solid advice. I guess for the most part even on a small lawn mower engine you could in theory use anti seize but I still wouldn't recommend it. As you stated how you torque you spark plugs I can say you have dodged a bullet because they are most likely over torqued.

I wasn't trying to cast anyone out but I felt it needed to be addressed quickly incase anyone seen that comment and thought it would be a good thing to do because there are a lot of people who don't have engine knowledge.
 

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I've never used antisieze on spark plug threads but I do normally put a small drop of Kroil on them. Just enough to "wick" into threads, this is just to make threading the plug into the head easier to avoid cross threading. I always use a torque wrench to tighten them if it's possible to get one into the area needed and I always use dielectric grease on the plug boot.
Rebuilt many engines over the years and do all the service on the family "fleet" of vehicles, I've never had any issues with this method.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk
 

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anti-sieze is supposed to be ok on plugs going into cast iron heads..... think old hot rods and such with 'Murican engines....... i remember reading on a spark plug manufacturers website (i think it was NGK or Nippondenso) that they absolutely do not recommend anti-sieze on the spark plug threads in aluminum heads as their plug threads were already chrome plated to resist galling..... as a 25+ year auto technician i can absolutely tell you that whenever i have difficulty removing spark plugs from an engine w/aluminum heads almost without fail i find evidence of anti-seize on the threads.... I'm thinking the anti-seize on the threads has some sort of chemical reaction when exposed to combustion gasses/heat causing it to turn to cement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Apparently u never owned a salt water vehicle.http://greenhulk.net/forums/showthread.php?t=285795&highlight=Spark+plugs+anti+seize
Well throw some on your KRX plugs (let me know how it works out for you) since you're trying to make a point on something...not really sure what though. Maybe work on spelling as well.;)
 

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Also, S.O.P. in aviation engines. Lycoming specifies copper anti-seize compound.
I haven't worked on an aircraft piston engine in about 15 years but if I remember right the spark plug boss was always helicoiled and the antiseize used was a runny black liquid with graphite in it. It would short out the electrodes if you got sloppy with it. Not sure why there is debate ngk is pretty adamant not to use antiseize on the spark plugs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I haven't worked on an aircraft piston engine in about 15 years but if I remember right the spark plug boss was always helicoiled and the antiseize used was a runny black liquid with graphite in it. It would short out the electrodes if you got sloppy with it. Not sure why there is debate ngk is pretty adamant not to use antiseize on the spark plugs.
RIGHT!! I wasn't aware these had outboard motors or aircraft engines:unsure:
 

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I have used anti-seize on my spark plugs in every single engine I have owned for the last 30 years. I have never had a single issue and will continue to do so. Anti-seize is good to go.
 

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The only issue with using antiseize is the torque spec. No different than spec for rod or main bearing bolts with oil or moly. Except for the long Ford plugs, lather it down and pray they come out haha. Personally, I've had more issues or scares with dry threads than lubed. U can definitely overtighten lubed threads if u don't know what your doing.
 

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so just to throw this in the mix: i never knew before that there was an official "spark plug thread lubricant" available; it is much different that standard "Anti-sieze" which is basically aluminum powder suspended in grease/oil; so if an engine manufacturer specifies it- such as 1Hasbeen has said, then it is stuff intended to be used in the spark plug threads. here:
 
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